Sailing to Byzantium

As we observe Turkish president Recep Tayyib Erdogan’s apparent drive to reestablish Ottoman autocracy, those who take a longer view of history will assert that there is nothing new under the sun. There is nothing unprecedented about Erdogan’s apparent urge to don the imperial purple, and join the long cavalcade of colourful emperors and sultans that ruled the land that now constitute modern Turkey.

Richard Fidler reminds of this as he literally walks us through the streets of Istanbul.

Part father-son quest, part travel story, ‘Ghost Empire’ is at once a history, and a treasury of tales both true and far-fetched. The Australian author and broadcaster, and onetime member of the comedy trio, the Doug Anthony Allstars, has written a blend of popular history and meditation on the significance of history.

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Although ‘Ghost Empire’ might in seem in parts overly breezy and lightweight, as an introduction to the ancient and wondrous city of  Byzantium/Constantinople/Istanbul, it is an highly informative portal to weightier albeit less entertaining books. This is not to say it is without its more harrowing moments. Fidler dwells as much on the gory as on the glory. And indeed, for many, particularly the sons of emperors and sultans, confidants and conspirators, life could indeed be nasty, brutish and short.

Whilst Fidler’s primary focus is the story of the Byzantines, concluding with the fall of Constantinople in 1453, he travels back and forth in Istanbul’s long and storied history, between the violent past and the tumultuous present, from Julius Caesar and Constantine the Great, and the power couple Justinian and Theodosia, through Mehmet the Conqueror and Suleiman the Magnificent, to Ataturk and Erdogan, and captures the magic and at times, mayhem of the fabled metropolis that inspired WB Yeats to write:

“Once out of nature I shall never take
My bodily form from any natural thing,
But such a form as Grecian goldsmiths make
Of hammered gold and gold enamelling
To keep a drowsy Emperor awake;
Or set upon a golden bough to sing
To lords and ladies of Byzantium
Of what is past, or passing, or to come”

Here are two earlier posts I have written about Istanbul, followed by a selection of photographs I have taken of this magical city:
https://howlinginfinite.com/2014/05/27/people-watching-in-sultanahmet/
https://howlinginfinite.com/2014/06/07/cha-cha-changes/

And here are some reviews of ‘Ghost Empire’:

http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/books/ghost-empire-review-richard-fidler-journeys-back-to-the-glory-of-constantinople-20160811-gqq6xo.html

http://www.canberratimes.com.au/act-news/canberra-life/richard-fidler-blends-the-historical-and-contemporary-in-his-new-book-ghost-empire-20160720-gq9js6.html

Istanbul, from Galata Tower

Istanbul, from Galata Tower

Cruising the Golden Horn

Cruising the Golden Horn

The Sulaymaniya Mosque

The Sulaymaniya Mosque

Aya Sofya

Aya Sofya

The Hippodrome and the Blue Mosque

The Hippodrome and the Blue Mosque

The Fortress of Europe

The Fortress of Europe

Valen's Aqueduct

Valen’s Aqueduct

Galata Tower

Galata Tower

Aya Sofya

Aya Sofya

Aya Sofya

Aya Sofya

Aya Sofya

Aya Sofya

Aya Sofya

Aya Sofya

Halfden the Viking's Grafitti in Hagia Sofia

Halfden the Viking’s Grafitti in Aya Sofya

Aya Sofya

Aya Sofya

The Blue Mosque

Aya Sofya

Sulaymaniya

Sulaymaniya

Justinian's Cistern

Justinian’s Cistern

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Apollo and Medusa

Apollo and Medusa

 

 

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